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For over a century irrigation districts in Central Oregon have played a pivotal role in the Deschutes Basin’s development and growth. Collectively they convey water to over 150,000 acres of productive farms and ranches as well as local cities, parks, and schools. The Districts have also undertaken unprecedented steps in collaboration with local, state and federal agencies, conservation groups and others to conserve water, and improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Deschutes River and its tributaries.

The Deschutes Basin Board of Control (DBBC) is comprised of eight Irrigation Districts including Arnold, Central Oregon, Lone Pine, North Unit, Ochoco, Swalley, Three sister and Tumalo Irrigation Districts.

Through the DBBC, formed in 2002, the Districts coordinate and share their respective resources and management assets to conserve water, improve their services for farm and ranch families, and enhance river conditions for wildlife species and recreational opportunities.


The present Arnold Irrigation District was first organized as the Arnold Irrigation Company on December 27, 1904 by W. Arnold, TO.O. Harshman and J.J. Reed and became official on January 9, 1905. Three other small irrigation companies, the Pine Forest Ditch Co., the Bend Company and the North Irrigation Co. later absorbed by the Arnold CO. diverted water from the Deschutes River a few miles south of Bend to deliver irrigation to the south and east of Bend. In 1936 the Arnold Irrigation Co. was reorganized as the Arnold Irrigation District and remains so today.

  • ESTABLISHED 1905

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 643

  • ACRES COVERED 4,384

A.M. Drake initiated the first water diversion company in Central Oregon, the Pilot Butte Development Company, that also platted and mapped Bend, Oregon. Prior to any water running, the company was sold to the Deschutes Irrigation & Power Company (D. I. & P.) the precursor of Central Oregon Irrigation Company.

By 1907, the Central Oregon and Pilot Butte Canals had been constructed. In 1910, as a result of foreclosure and ensuing reorganization, the Central Oregon Irrigation Company was created. On December 17, 1917 the Central Oregon Irrigation Company was turned over to its users who organized the Central Oregon Irrigation District.  Central Oregon Irrigation District (“COID”) is now a Municipal Corporation of the State of Oregon.

The system consists of two main canals: the Pilot Butte Canal, which runs north, through Bend, Redmond and Terrebonne; and the Central Oregon Canal, which runs east, through Bend, Alfalfa and Powell Butte. Both canals divert water from the Deschutes River.

The District provides water for about 45,000 acres within an 180,000 acre area in Central Oregon. More than 700 miles of canals provide agricultural and industrial water to the Terrebonne, Redmond, Bend, Alfalfa and Powell Butte areas. The District provides water to the City of Redmond, numerous subdivisions as well as many parks and schools in Bend,

  • ESTABLISHED 1900

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 3,600

  • ACRES COVERED 44,500

The Lone Pine Irrigation District was formed in 1920. It has also been known as the Crook County Improvement District #1. We have 20 patrons and irrigate 2,369 acres in our district. It is located 7 miles east of Terrebonne, OR and is a beautiful valley of sandy-loam soil that produces grain, grass hay, alfalfa hay, numerous seed crops, field corn, potatoes, and mint. The 5 Board of Director members are Dan Flitner,chairman, Terry Smith,vice-chair, Jack Cochran,treasurer/secretary, Tim Kuenzi, and Bob Franke.

P.O. Box 564, Terrebonne, OR 97760
lonepineirrigation@gmail.com

  • ESTABLISHED 1900

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 21

  • ACRES COVERED 2,369

NUID employs an array of measures to conserve water and ensure the reliability of its water supply. In recent years, the District has lined 12 miles of its main canal and piped 43 miles of laterals to reduce seepage losses. In 2012/2013, the District added lining to 5 miles of its main canal and helped to finance the piping of 4,900 feet of COID’s “I” Lateral, resulting in approximately 9,200 acre-feet of water savings. NUID plans to use the water from these two projects as a replacement for a portion of its Crooked River supplies so that the District can allow water that would otherwise be diverted from the Crooked River to remain instream.

  • ESTABLISHED 1916

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 2,265

  • ACRES COVERED 59,000

OID has implemented numerous conservation and restoration projects. Recent initiatives include the lining or piping of 5,880 feet of canals to reduce seepage; the replacement of the Ryegrass, Breese, Smith, and Cook dams with inverted weirs, the replacement of the Reynolds and Pine Products dams with siphons; the replacement of the Schnoor dam with infiltration galleries; and the improvement of the Red Granary and Jones dams to benefit fish and wildlife. The District has also made 11 of its 12 diversions “fish friendly” with screens and other passage structures.

  • ESTABLISHED 1916

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 881

  • ACRES COVERED 20,061

Despite being one of Oregon’s smaller irrigation districts, SID has returned the largest amount of water to the Deschutes River through its conservation projects. In 2009, the District completed the piping of 5.1 miles of its main canal along with several smaller laterals. Altogether, the District has returned 38 cfs of water, with an 1899 water right (the most senior on the river), to the Deschutes River. A year later, SID completed the first small in-conduit hydroelectric plant in the State of Oregon in 20 years. This new 0.75 MW facility is capable of producing enough clean, renewable electricity for up to 350 homes.

  • ESTABLISHED 1899

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 662

  • ACRES COVERED 4,331

TSID is an acclaimed leader in water conservation. Over 40 of the 60 miles of canals and ditches utilized by the District and its patrons have been piped. Conserved water has been used to permanently provide a minimum instream flow of 20 cfs in Whychus Creek downstream of the District’s diversion. Piping will also allow the installation of the 0.7 MW Main Canal Hydroelectric Project, as well as the delivery of pressurized water to patrons to reduce their reliance on electric pumps. The District also completely redesigned its Whychus Creek diversion, which included the installation of a state-of-the-art fish screen.

  • ESTABLISHED 1891

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 402

  • ACRES COVERED 7,925

Originally known as the Tumalo Project, Tumalo Irrigation District (TID) was diverting water in support of regional agriculture as early as the 1880s. It formally became a district in 1900. Today, it has two diversion sources, Tumalo Creek below Shevlin Park and the Deschutes River near Pioneer Park, as well as Crescent Lake storage. The District serves 667 patrons; manages more than 80 miles of piped and open canals; and irrigates more than 8,110 acres growing hay, alfalfa, garlic, lavender, and pastures for livestock. The District’s mission is to manage water resources to meet present and future needs of its patrons in ways that are economically and environmentally responsible. The District’s priorities are water conservation, improving water delivery efficiencies, and preserving and restoring native habitat in the Deschutes River Basin. To date, the District has piped 28,600 feet in the Bend Feed Canal and Tumalo Feed and an additional 9,562 feet of open canal in the Tumalo Feed under CW37 conserving over 10 cfs of water in Tumalo Creek and 2500 AF in Crescent Lake. An additional 4.4 miles of open canals in the Tumalo Feed will be piped over the next five to 10 years as partners are recruited and secured and funding is available. Learn more about Tumalo Irrigation District at www.tumalo.org.

  • ESTABLISHED 1900

  • HOUSEHOLDS SERVED 655

  • ACRES COVERED 8,110

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